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Archive for September, 2009

Style Birmingham

Style Birmingham

Style Birmingham

Style Birmingham

Style Birmingham

Style Birmingham

Style Birmingham is an event show cased by Selfridges, House of Fraser and the Mailbox. Together they present a fashion show, encompassing all of the key autumn/ winter season’s hottest trends. The show is sponsored by Style from the Sunday Times fashion magazine. This show featured a range of ready to wear garments, from high street fashion labels such as Miss Sixty, Firetrap or Diesel to key fashion icons such as Vivienne Westwood, Stella McCartney and Alexander McQueen. Key trends for this season feature Dynasty; a selection of beautifully cut suits and jackets,

with elegant evening dresses in beautifully cut fabrics.

Shaped Vs Draped features beautifully fluid drapes in exaggerated forms. Cut and bias is key her in bringing together dynamic fashion silhouettes in unusual fabrics. Get Knitted was a collection full of South America inspired colours. Deep reds and rich colourful trimmed edges to short knit dresses. Pom Pom’s are scattered all over the presented outfits, either as fabric manipulation or accessories. Huge knitted bangles in bright colours rise up the models’ arms, each bangle is wool that has been wrapped around the bangle in plaited or knotted pattern techniques. Other themes include Tweed, Leather, Disco and Mood Indigo. The fashion show was alive with the rich, wide colour palette of this season. Fabrics are wide and diverse but easily interchangeable. The bags featured in the collection are revolutionary, with huge leather bags held by metal structures or large wooden beads. I think a key feature of this season is accessories, bold, bright and symbolic of your personality. Fear is the ultimate enemy in this exciting, vibrant seasons fashion.

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The new Darwin Centre at the Natural History Museum is filed with thousands of species of animals, plants and habitats, In this collection I found the structures of plant forms and nests very inspiring. In particular, I found a collection of wasps and bees nests very interesting. These nests have been formed from paper, collected fro Trees with paper elements in the surrounding area. The insects have then added a sticky residue to the paper particles creating a paper mache effect. This is very inspiring, the idea that unusual structural forms and functions can be used to create a habitat due to differing environments and locations. The structural forms and functions of the various objects and habitats at the museum encouraged my desire to experiment with garment construction and fabric manipulation.

I found the tree exhibition piece equally inspiring. In South America they have some of the largest trees in the world. This particular tree was cut down at approximately 700 years old. The pattern formed by the early yearly rings are very interesting, I would like to experiment with textiles, creating patterns replicating this structure in various design processes.

http://www.nhm.ac.uk

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Show Studio

Show Studio

Show Studio was launched in 2000, for the past decade the website has revolutionised the way in which fashion is globally communicated.  This exhibition at Somerset House is testament to the fact that from the turn of the twenty-first century, there has been a revolution in the fashion image.  The internet allows for a two-way communication where the audience can participate in the art, shaping it’s path.
Show studio communicates fashion through; interactive projection onto fashion silhouettes, fashion films showing the creation and promotion of garments, live models in the exhibition wearing designer’s clothes, and placing designers or models in front of a camera and not directing them for a period of time.
Fashion film gives fashion the communication it has always wanted.  Instead of being restricted to a  static print, dominantly a photograph, fashion is able to be portrayed as a visual, mobile art form.  This gives the garment the visual communication which it is designed for.
The actual definition of Show Studio is unknown to even Nick Knight.  The original concept for Show Studio came to Nick Knight and Peter Saville in 1998.  Both artists were inspired by the idea of having a place to work, that wasn’t created to sell a product, but was instead created simply for the love of art.
Alexander McQueen’s transformation of a bride groom into a bride, is an excellent example of the advantages in communication film gives to fashion.  In a frenzy of cutting, ripping, painting and gaffer taping, McQueen works his famous cutting and draping skills to revolutionise the original fashion silhouette.  The viewer is privileged to watch, what is often, the unseen.  The designer himself at work.  With no where to hide from mistakes and errors, McQueen is put in the spotlight, broadcasted live in front of an audience.
Another exhibit which I found particularly inspiring was the promotion of menswear by stylist Simon Foxton.  Different models at selected times are placed upon a stage with a chair.  The model will be styled in an outfit by a fashion designer at different points throughout the day.  This installation is similar to a broadcast on ShowStudio.com in 2005.  This aimed to replace a photographer with limited gaze, to the impartial viewing of a webcam.  Over a period of four hours the viewers of Show Studio could log on to watch models maintaining their poses, with the option to interact with via the phone number posted on the site.  I think this form of advertising designer’s outfits, is revolutionary.  To be able to interact and watch how a model lives and breathes in clothes, expands the breadths of fashion communication globally.
Show Studio’s Peter Saville collaborated with one of my favourite illustrators Julie Verhoeven, in the exhibit ‘Forget-Me-Not.’  By supplying Julie Verhoeven with images of Japanese bondage, Peter Saville inspired her to illustrate pornographic wallpaper for a labyrinthe.  Verhoeven’s work produced a sequence of female pornography, which grew darker in subject and expressive in execution as the illustrations progressed.  Show Studio’s designer’s incorporated hot spots into Verhoeven’s work, the viewer then interacts with these by moving the cursor over the organs and sexual acts depicted.  This then leads to the next, more explicit level.  Causing the viewer to question to stimulative, active participant they have become.
ShowStudio is responsible for bringing together the missing components in the fashion industry.  As an online source of communication, it uncovers the very essence and capture of creativity in design.

http://www.showstudio.com/

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